Developing critical thinking skills in nursing students by group dynamics

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Critical thinking is one of the most important concepts in the field of education. Given the existing discrepancies, this study aimed to compare the critical thinking skills of freshmen and senior nursing students.

Developing critical thinking skills in nursing students by group dynamics

Critical Thinking: The Development of an Essential Skill for Nursing Students

Translate this page from English Print Page Change Text Size: What makes the thinking of a nurse different from a doctor, a dentist or an engineer? It is how we view the client and the type of problems we deal with in practice when we engage in client care.

To think like a nurse requires that we learn the content of nursing; the ideas, concepts and theories of nursing and develop our intellectual capacities and skills so that we become disciplined, self-directed, critical thinkers.

In nursing, critical thinking for clinical decision-making is the ability to think in a systematic and logical manner with openness to question and reflect on the reasoning process used to ensure safe nursing practice and quality care Heaslip.

Critical thinking when developed in the practitioner includes adherence to intellectual standards, proficiency in using reasoning, a commitment to develop and maintain intellectual traits of the mind and habits of thought and the competent use of thinking skills and abilities for sound clinical judgments and safe decision-making.

Intellectual Standards for Reasoning Practitioners in nursing who are critical thinkers value and adhere to intellectual standards. Critical thinkers strive to be clear, accurate, precise, logical complete, significant and fair when they listen, speak, read and write.

Critical thinkers think deeply and broadly. All thinking can be examined in light of these standards and as we reflect on the quality of our thinking we begin to recognize when we are being unclear, imprecise, vague or inaccurate. As nurses, we want to eliminate irrelevant, inconsistent and illogical thoughts as we reason about client care.

Developing critical thinking skills in nursing students by group dynamics

Nurses use language to clearly communicate in-depth information that is significant to nursing care. Nurses are not focused on the trivial or irrelevant.

Elements of Reasoned Thinking Reasoning in nursing involves eight elements of thought. Critical thinking involves trying to figure out something; a problem, an issue, the views of another person, a theory or an idea.

To figure things out we need to enter into the thinking of the other person and then to comprehend as best we can the structure of their thinking. This also applies to our own thinking as well.

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I want to understand the interpretations and claims the author is making and the assumptions that underlie his thinking. As I come to understand the author in-depth I will also begin to recognize the strength and weakness of his reasoning.

I will be able to offer my perspective on the subject at hand with a clear understanding of how the author would respond to my ideas on the subject. The Elements of Thought All thinking, if it is purposeful, includes the following elements of thought Paul, The problem, question, concern or issue being discussed or thought about by the thinker.

What the thinker is attempting to figure out. The purpose or goal of the thinking. Why we are attempting to figure something out and to what end.

Critical Thinking and Nursing This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract Critical thinking is defined as the mental process of actively and skillfully perception, analysis, synthesis and evaluation of collected information through observation, experience and communication that leads to a decision for action.

What do we hope to accomplish. The frame of reference, points of view or even world view that we hold about the issue or problem. The assumptions that we hold to be true about the issue upon which we base our claims or beliefs.

The central concepts, ideas, principles and theories that we use in reasoning about the problem. The evidence, data or information provided to support the claims we make about the issue or problem.

Significance

The interpretations, inferences, reasoning, and lines of formulated thought that lead to our conclusions. The implications and consequences that follow from the positions we hold on the issue or problem.

Developing critical thinking skills in nursing students by group dynamics

When nurses reason they use these elements of thought to figure out difficult questions and recognize that their thinking could be flawed or limited by lack of in-depth understanding of the problem at issue therefore, they critically monitor their thinking to ensure that their thinking meets the standards for intellectual thought.

In summary, as a critical thinker, I am able to figure out by reading or listening critically what nurse scholars believe about nursing and on what basis nurses act as they practice nursing. To do this I must clearly comprehend the thinking of another person by figuring out the logic of their thinking.

I must comprehend clearly the thinking of myself by figuring out my own thoughts on the subject at hand. Finally, I must use intellectual standards to evaluate my thinking and the thinking of others on a given problem such that I can come to a defensible, well reasoned view of the problem and therefore, know what to believe or do in a given circumstance.

To do this I must be committed to developing my mind as a self-directed, independent critical thinker. I must value above all else the intellectual traits and habits of thought that critical thinkers possess. Intellectual Traits and Habits of Thought To develop as a critical thinker one must be motivated to develop the attitudes and dispositions of a fair-minded thinker.

That is, one must be willing to suspend judgments until one truly understands another point of view and can articulate the position that another person holds on an issue. Nurses come to reasoned judgments so that they can act competently in practice.

They continually monitor their thinking; questioning and reflecting on the quality of thinking occurring in how they reason about nursing practice. Sloppy, superficial thinking leads to poor practice.In a longitudinal design study, the critical thinking skills were compared in medical sciences students in two sequential semesters using the California Critical Thinking Skills Test.

The test is divided into two parts (parts 1 and 2), including 17 items in each part. This study examined the group critical thinking skills of students in a first-year general education course.

A compound rubric was designed to assess critical thinking in group papers on social policies. Does the teaching intervention conceptualised by Kuhn's () model enhance students’ critical-thinking ability when it is applied to Hong Kong primary schools?

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INTRODUCTION

Can effective group work strategies make a difference to students’ critical thinking skills and dispositions? 3. Critical thinking development in nursing students is a topic that continues to challenge nurse educators. A review of the literature identified several teaching strategies that have been employed in an effort to provide students with the skills.

Critical Thinking in Nursing Linda L. Kerby, MA, RN, Promoting critical thinking skills requires active and ongoing dialog between student and instructor. Reflective thinking activities Based Learning as a Teaching Methodology on the Development of Critical Thinking.”.

DEVELOPMENT OF CRITICAL THINKING IN NURSING STUDENTS 14 nurses have minimal decision-making skills and critical thinking ability (Wilgis & McConnell; Wettstein, Wilkins, Gardner, & Restrepo, ). The result of minimal critical thinking skills can lead to poor patient outcomes including injury or death (Wilgis & McConnell).

Critical Thinking Skills in Nursing Students: a Comparison Between Freshmen and Senior Students